Bunny Blog

Category Archives: Rabbit Rescues

February is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month!

Rabbit valentineThis month is Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month. And in case you weren’t aware, adopting a rabbit instead of buying one from a breeder or pet store has many benefits.

  • You can give a bunny a second chance. Through no fault of their own, some rabbits are surrendered to shelters or abandoned. When you adopt a rabbit (or pair of rabbits) from a shelter, you can ensure from that point on, that animal will lead a happy and healthy life.
  • You can find a good match. Volunteers at rabbit rescues come to know each one of their rabbits’ personalities. You can find a good match for you and your family (and your other rabbit if you’re looking to adopt a bond mate), when you adopt from a rescue.
  • You can walk away with a litter-trained bunny. Rabbits at rescues are often litter-trained by volunteers.
  • You save yourself money. Rescue rabbits are spayed/neutered at the appropriate age while at the shelter or in foster homes. Sometimes they are microchipped. So adopting from a rescue will save you money on costly veterinary expenses.

If you want to learn more, see our article, “Benefits of Adopting a Pet Rabbit.”

Speed Dating for the Lonely Rabbit

White rabbit and black and white rabbit

Potential roommate Tonya meets Moo for the first time. Photo by Yana Paskova, New York Times.

Moo is a two-year-old black and white bunny. His owners, Ashley Chui and Arthur Chow, thought he might be lonely while they were at work. So they enlisted the help of Amy Odum, a longtime volunteer of Animal Care Centers of NYC and a bunny matchmaker.

She places Moo in a small room and brings in a few potential roommates. He is met with a range of reactions: rebuffs, disinterest, mounting, and sniffing– everything a bunny owner should expect when introducing potential bond mates.

To read the full delightful account of Moo’s speed dating session, see the New York Times article, “Speed Dating Rabbits.”

You can also learn about the process of bonding bunnies in our article, Bonding Your Pet Bunnies.

If you’ve got a single bun, bunny speed dating might be something to consider. Your bunny may enjoy the companionship of another rabbit. With February being Adopt a Rescued Rabbit Month, why not schedule a speed dating session at your local rabbit rescue or shelter?

Featured Rabbit Rescue: New Jersey House Rabbit Society

njhrslogoThe mission of the New Jersey House Rabbit Society, based in Monroe Township, is to promote the well-being of domestic rabbits and to secure their place as a companion animal in society and in our homes.

Their focus is on educating the public on the proper care of companion house rabbits and providing a low-cost spay/neuter program. You can find a?wealth of information about caring for house rabbits at their website, njhrs.com, or at their Facebook page.

Although they are not taking in rabbits at this time, they do list?non-NJHRS rabbits who need homes–whether from private homes?or?from a Good Samaritan who found a stray– on their website and/or Facebook page. NJHRS also lists adoptable house rabbits from both shelters and rescue groups in NJ, NY, PA, DE, and MD each week on their Facebook page for those who may be interested.

njhrsView rabbits looking for forever homes here.

New Jersey HRS depends on donations to fund their work. Support the NJHRS here.

Featured Rabbit Organization: Minnesota Companion Rabbit Society

The Minnesota Companion Rabbit Society (MCRS) is a volunteer-based, non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of companion rabbits.

MCRS works to let people know that domestic rabbits can and do make wonderful companions, as long as you are willing to meet them on their terms. They teach Bunny Basics classes, maintain a phone and email hotline so that people can contact them with questions or problems, and generally try to keep rabbits and their human companions living happily together.

Rabbit looking out window.

Meet Amber, one of the available rabbits at the Minnesota Companion Rabbit Society.

The organization also hosts regular Hoppy Hour events, in which bunnies can come to romp and play with other bunnies. These socialization events are held at three locations around the Twin Cities. All rabbits must be spay/neutered and be in good health in order to participate.

Learn more about the Minnesota Companion Rabbit Society at their website.

Featured Rabbit Rescue: Buckeye House Rabbit Society

The Buckeye House Rabbit Society, based in Athens, OH, is a chapter of the national House Rabbit Society. Serving Ohio since 1997, their all-volunteer, federally-recognized, non-profit organization rescues abandoned rabbits and educates the public about rabbit care.

With representatives in Athens, Canton, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Toledo, and a growing number of volunteers, they work to bring Ohioans up-to-date information about adopting and caring for indoor companion rabbits.

Three baby rabbits

Meet Karley, Bunny, and Lindsay. The Buckeye HRS took in a pregnant rabbit who was dumped at a cottontail rehabber’s doorstep in Indiana. These are just three of the eleven baby bunnies that resulted!

Learn how to get involved with the Buckeye House Rabbit Society or donate to their organization at their website.

Featured Rabbit Rescue: Alabama EARS

Alabama EARS, a rabbit rescue based in Birmingham, AL, is a 501(c) organization and a chapter of the House Rabbit Society.

Their focus is to rescue rabbits from shelters, litter box train them, socialize them, and learn about them so they can place them in loving forever homes.? They also work to spread awareness about house rabbit care, participating in animal education events and working with local animal shelters.

Lop-eared rabbit

Meet Sally, a rabbit available for adoption at Alabama EARS.

Alabama EARS also has sanctuary rabbits, which are rabbits not deemed adoptable who live permanently with one of the organization’s foster parents. Often a serious medical condition is the cause, and the caretaker would need the specialized knowledge to care for a special needs bunny.

To learn more about Alabama EARS or to donate to the organization, visit their website.

Reign of the Internet Bunny

The Minnesota Companion Rabbit Society is launching a new campaign to make Internet Bunnies the new Internet Cats.

Watch a fun music video below:

From the Minnesota Companion Rabbit’s press release:

Starting today, people who love rabbits or who are suffering from cat video fatigue can visit www.mncompanionrabbit.org/internet-bunny/ to view a bunny-themed music video and four-minute documentary about domestic rabbits and the organization’s “Hoppy Hour” events.

In addition, visitors are encouraged to vote on the rabbit they would like to see lead the charge versus Grumpy Cat, Lil Bub, Maru and their army of feline friends. Each candidate has a profile on the site that includes their personality traits, cat rival, least favorite cat video, and why they should win.

Learn more and vote at the Internet Bunny website. Voting ends August 21.

Palomino Rabbits at B.U.N.S. in Santa Barbara, CA

Right before Christmas this past year, Buns Urgently Needing Shelter (B.U.N.S.) in Santa Barbara, CA received a delivery of 22 Palomino rabbits. Now, months later, the shelter still needs your help! (A delivery of 22 bunnies is a lot to take on all at once!)

Palomino rabbits at B.U.N.S.

Feeding time for the Christmas bunnies.

You can help the shelter by:

More about B.U.N.S.

B.U.N.S. is an independent non-profit corporation dedicated to the care and welfare of rabbits and guinea pigs. B.U.N.S. works to find bunnies and guinea pigs permanent homes, and educates the public on caring for their guinea pig and rabbit companion. Visit their website >

House Rabbit Society Offers Aid to Rabbits Found in Landfill

Rescued rabbitsThe latest Emergency Rescue Grant from the House Rabbit Society was awarded to Napa Humane Society and the student chapter of the UC Davis Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association to help pay for spays and neuters of 27 rabbits rescued from a field near the Fairfield landfill in Solano County, California.

If you would like to help rescue efforts like these, you can donate to the House Rabbit Society towards their Emergency Rescue Grant program. Learn more >